Tag Archives: Makati

culture by Alyssa Castillo

Single in the City: Mr. Type-A of Makati

“How could he be so unlike the guy on Bumble? Is this what it feels like to be catfished?”

Ask anyone and they would tell you that dating today is quite complex. While technology adds a layer of convenience to meeting new people, it does so with some baggage in tow. We send off our twenty-something into to the digital landscape to find out how things really are. The mission? Go on a Bumble date for every NBHD we cover, and live to tell the tale. First up: Mr. Type A of Makati.

From his pics down to his About page, he seemed adventurous. You know, the kind with a lot of out-of-town photos jumping off cliffs and skydiving? Much to my surprise, Mr. Type A, at 25, is a straight-laced corporate guy who lives by a strict daily routine.

Chatting with him was a breeze; he could carry a conversation. But he suddenly seemed so much older upon meeting him in the flesh. How could he be so unlike the guy on Bumble? Is this what it feels like to be catfished? Was I wrong for having any expectations?

He shared about his life, his family, his fondest memories with friends, and even some irrational fears. Initially, I was overwhelmed by how much I’ve gotten to know about him already before our food was served. I got a hunch that he’s been single for a while and turns out I was right when he admitted that he “doesn’t make time for relationships.” I see. Maybe he just really needs someone new to talk to. Then, he explained that having a Type-A personality is what pushed him to rethink his monotonous lifestyle. This Bumble date is a step for him to experience new things and meet new people. As much as he wants to have fun, he first needs to learn how.

I also shared about myself here and there, and how my life is like as a writer. Our contrasting lives shocked him, and he later on mused over the fact that it was refreshing and exciting to sit down with somebody so easygoing. But halfway through my meal, I found myself itching to reach for my phone or check my watch. I think he noticed how bored I was getting so he quickly switched up the topic to Astrology. My ears perked up, and we talked more about that until we finished dessert.

That night I came home a little more tired than usual. The three-hour dinner felt like a 12-hour chore. He was decent and all, but we just didn’t click. So when he messaged to ask for a second date, I told him that as co-Air Signs (he’s a Libra, I’m an Aquarius), that I think we’d be great at just being friends. He didn’t respond after that.

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Alyssa Castillo
Alyssa Castillo is a freelance writer and is concurrently Rogue Media's Editorial Assistant for The NBHD. She reads for fun, writes for a living, and wastes too much time entertaining the possibility of a zombie apocalypse. Find her on Instagram as @alyssakcastillo.
culture by Nana Caragay

Small Girl, Big City: The 2017 NBHD Gift Guide (Makati)

From handmade dolls to sinful doughnuts, who knew the central business district was such a great hunting ground for artisanal and artistic treats?

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The NBHD Team put together this year’s Gift Guide by following one simple instruction: troop to different districts to explore the mom-and-pop shops, holes in the wall, and hidden spots the locals favor for their specialty needs. The main restrictions were that each store had to be headquartered in our assigned haunt, and of course, filled with items we would be happy to find under our own Christmas trees.

And with that, here are the cool things we found in our NBHD Gift Guide to Makati. (You’re welcome.)

 

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(01) Graphic-print notebook, P75, Design Dept.
(02) Vintage notebook, P30, Ritual
DESIGN DEPT. IS AT 3A VALDECON BUILDING, 20 JUPITER ST., BEL-AIR, MAKATI, 0917-838-3454, AT DAILY GRIND STORE, AND ON FACEBOOK AND INSTAGRAM / RITUAL IS AT 2/F JACKSON BUILDING, 926 ARNAIZ AVENUE, SAN LORENZ VILLAGE, MAKATI, 734-5486, AT RITUAL.PH, AND ON FACEBOOK AND INSTAGRAM

 

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(01) Vanilla Glaze doughnut, P50
(02) Boston Cream doughnut, P70
(03-04) Garam Masala doughnut, P50
(05) Blueberry Glaze doughnut, P50, all Poison Coffee and Doughnuts
POISON COFFEE AND DOUGHNUTS IS AT THE ALLEY AT KARRIVIN PLAZA, 2316 PASONG TAMO EXT., MAKATI, 752-0327, AND ON FACEBOOK AND INSTAGRAM

 

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(01) Ifugao mules in monochromatic red, P3,500, Great Women
(02) Coffee Body Scrub, P230, Ritual
(03) Pinch-A-Week soil conditioner, P80, Ritual
(04) Cosi. Candle 5 in Cinnamon Spice and Mint, P2,400, Tropa
(05) Ilog Maria Sting-Less citronella mosquito repellant, P350 for 35ml, Tropa
(06) Framed 30 x 30cm art print, P2,500, Design Dept.
(07) Young Blood cap, P595, Design Dept.
(08) Blueberry Glaze and Garam Masala doughnuts, P50 each, Poison Coffee and Doughnuts
(09) Crocheted Big Angel doll, P1,900, Great Women
(10) Tigre y Oliva hand-crafted chocolate bar in Subasta, P290, Ritual
(11) Eairth Tranquil sleep mask in Coal, P900, Tropa
(12) Eairth Ballerin bra top in Scarlett (on model), P2,950, Tropa
(13) Lifting Oat Mask, P200, Ritual; Graphic-print notebook, P75, Design Dept
(14) Graphic-print notebook, P75, Design Dept.
(15) Vintage notebook, P30, Ritual
RITUAL IS AT 2/F JACKSON BUILDING, 926 ARNAIZ AVENUE, SAN LORENZ VILLAGE, MAKATI, 734-5486, AT RITUAL.PH, AND ON FACEBOOK AND INSTAGRAM / GREAT WOMEN IS AT UNIT 1 G/F TESORO’S BUILDING, 1606 ARNAIZ AVENUE, SAN LORENZO VILLAGE, MAKATI, 772-2433, AT GREATWOMENASEAN.COM, AND ON FACEBOOK AND INSTAGRAM / TROPA IS AT UNIT 5, 117 AGUIRRE ST., LEGASPI VILLAGE, MAKATI, 541-1335, AT TROPASTORE.COM, AND ON FACEBOOK AND INSTAGRAM / DESIGN DEPT. IS AT 3A VALDECON BUILDING, 20 JUPITER ST., BEL-AIR, MAKATI, 0917-838-3454, AT DAILY GRIND STORE, AND ON FACEBOOK AND INSTAGRAM / POISON COFFEE AND DOUGHNUTS IS AT THE ALLEY AT KARRIVIN PLAZA, 2316 PASONG TAMO EXT., MAKATI, 752-0327, AND ON FACEBOOK AND INSTAGRAM.

 

Photography by Renzo Navarro
Art Direction and Styling by Mags Ocampo
Model Andrea Beldua
Produced by Nana Caragay

 

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Nana Caragay
Nana Caragay is a magazine editor, writer, voice over talent, and former gymnast. When she's not stalking cute dogs on social media, she's most likely shopping, working out, watching E!, or drinking iced tea. She's on Instagram @nanacaragay.
food + drinks by Alyssa Castillo

This “seasonal” kitchen will take you to another world

Persephone’s bold take on the Filipino cuisine makes it Makati’s newest gem

Jessie Roasa has loved cooking since she was young, and was always doing so for her family at home. “I like to serve food and be accommodating,” she shares. Jessie brings this passion to the recently opened Persephone along Jupiter, which celebrates Pinoy food and infuses it with other influences and Southeast Asian twists.

In college, she got into food photography, which gave her an excuse to cook more. It wasn’t until she studied for a term out of the country where her love for Filipino cuisine manifested. While meeting people from different parts of the world, she participated in some sort of culinary culture sharing; she enjoyed explaining dishes like Tapsilog to her newfound friends while learning (and tasting) their local food.

persephone-1 persephone-5 persephone-4 persephone-3 persephone-2A younger, more dynamic and more colorful spin to Pinoy food, the Persephone menu toggles from rice bowls good for sharing and whopping burgers to pescetarian and vegan-friendly options. (Kangkong or sweet potato chips, anyone?) The kitchen staff admits to experimenting with ingredients people aren’t usually crazy about. See their Inadobong Atay, a “revolutionary” dish with rice noodles that Jessie herself swears by.

The restaurant is named after the Greek goddess of spring and the queen of the underworld, an inspiration that is seen in both its interiors and its gastronomic approach. The space is surrounded by flowers, side-by-side with bright and colorful murals. Meanwhile, the sweetness of their cocktails masks the punch of its alcohol content, which plays on the “queen of the dead” half of the personality. Her kitchen sees meal creation this way as well; Jessie believes that Persephone was tired of this one life so she chose to diversify it, challenging herself to grow outside of her comfort zone in the process

“Customers are changing and they also always want to try new things in the food scene,” she says.

Produced by Alyssa Castillo
Photography by Renzo Navarro
Art direction by Mags Ocampo

PERSEPHONE IS IN 120 JUPITER ST., BARANGAY BEL-AIR, MAKATI CITY. FOR MORE INFORMATON, VISIT THEIR FACEBOOK PAGE AT FACEBOOK.COM/PERSEPHONEPH
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Alyssa Castillo
Alyssa Castillo is a freelance writer and is concurrently Rogue Media's Editorial Assistant for The NBHD. She reads for fun, writes for a living, and wastes too much time entertaining the possibility of a zombie apocalypse. Find her on Instagram as @alyssakcastillo.
food + drinks by Cedric S. Reyes

Elbow to Elbow in Legazpi

Sharing a drink is an intimate affair. Here, the boys from Blind Pig, The Curator, and The Belle & Dragon get personal.

Elbow to Elbow is a series of across-the-bar conversations with bartenders from Manila’s drinking districts. Every month, The Neighborhood speaks with the guys and girls in back about the mix, the tipple, and our life in the city. It’s a collection of field notes and kind advice between bar regulars and the people that keep them inebriated.

There are those who drink to get drunk, and there are others who’d just like to drink. Those of the latter persuasion come to Legazpi, where the bars are dimly lit and the cocktails are high-proof. Legazpi is an urban village found in a deep corner of Makati’s central business district. A straight-tie commercial area by day, Legazpi bares its teeth at night, when offices close up shop and employees scatter in search for some much-needed hydration.IMG_6796During the day, Legazpi’s bars are discreet enough to belong in the area’s corporate setting. These bars are designed such that they never draw any more attention than is due. One might drive right past The Belle & Dragon, Blind Pig, and The Curator, neighborhood staples, without batting an eyelash.

The Belle & Dragon is heralded only by a few large banners, bearing their name and obscuring everything that might suggest they serve alcohol. When the wind hits their banners just so, commuters get a glimpse of the long bar that stands like an institution in Belle & Dragon’s al fresco space.IMG_6771-3Just a few streets away, Blind Pig lives true to its tradition as a speakeasy. Demarcated only by a small sign in braille, Blind Pig asks even its regulars to leave a friendly knock on their wooden door before they’re let in to their cavernous space.

This is in stark contrast to The Curator’s decidedly young, come as you are approach. The Curator’s bar is the backroom of a concrete enclosure, the brightly lit landing of three steps. This entrance to the bar operates as a café during the day. After the café closes, the staff moves behind the sliding doors of their backroom bar. Inside, the interiors are decorated only by vinyl records and tall containers filled with citrus fruits. There’s no signage announcing the establishment out front, only a fluorescent light fixture that asks in sans serif – How does it feel? As it turns out, a few drinks in Legazpi is all it takes to find out.

The Belle & Dragon / Roy
Ask for the story behind your drink.elbow2elbow 3Sometimes, despite being confronted with an intimidating bar menu, I’ll choose something I actually like. Chances are, I’ll forget what that drink is called and start from scratch the next time I come around. I never remember what my drink is called because I never bother finding out the story behind the name. I ordered The Belle and Dragon’s Zero Tolerance, a sweet mix of Jameson, almond liquor, and lemon juice, thinking it might be a name I can actually remember.

As Roy serves the drink, he explains that despite its name, the Zero Tolerance is not for those with low alcohol tolerance. The reason for the name, he says, goes way back.

Roy is one of the originals. Together with a few other bar back boys, he’s been with The Belle & Dragon since its inception over two years ago, and remembers fondly the original team he was a part of. Most of the originals have gone overseas in search of better paying jobs, but Roy has stuck around. One of the originals, a close friend of Roy, was called Zero. Zero has gone abroad, too, but his name and the drink he created are fresh in Roy’s memory.

The Curator / Jeco Co
There are only four things a good drink needs to have.elbow2elbow 2Jeco is one of the founders of The Curator, where drinks have pride. He asks me gamely how I’m feeling and what I’d like to drink. He promises the drink he’ll make is for me and no one else. One word is all he needs to hear (creamy) before he starts picking up bottles and measuring liquor in cups. “I’d like to think,” he says, gesturing to the rest of the bar staff with his hands full of alcohol, “that I’ve instilled in these guys enough pride to change a drink if a customer ever sends it back to the bar.”

Every good drink, he says, boils down to four things: temperature, balance, dilution, and personality. This means that every drink has to be cold, has to have the right mix of ingredients, has to have the right concentration of alcohol, and must, above all, be alive. The drink he serves is a tall, frothy glass of Oban single malt whisky, egg whites, and cream, with a roasted slice of corn perched on top of the mousse. The drink is smooth, almost savory, and very, very cold. Jeco’s pride is rightly earned.

Blind Pig / Joey Cerdinia
In drinking as in life, be grateful.elbow2elbow 1Joey is alone behind the bar of Blind Pig, eagerly awaiting orders. He’s been doing this for six years now, since Blind Pig opened its sliding doors as the first speakeasy in the city. He credits the length of his stay to the kindness of his boss, and the small wins he’s earned for himself. Joey’s just happy to be here.

When he applied to be head bartender six years ago, he had no idea what a speakeasy was, or if the people hiring him were even legitimate. He walked into it all blind. But Blind Pig has since given Joey a kingdom to command and a home base to return to. As he serves us the Bequest, a bright pink cocktail, he confides that the drink is a tribute to the owners of the bar, who have trusted him all these years. The Bequest is rum, aperol, lime juice, and an elderflower liquor. It’s also Joey’s way of giving back, and leaving something behind.

Though different in their approach to the perfect beverage, these three Legazpi bars can all agree that a quality drink is an understated one. Because it’s without embellishment, drinking in Legazpi is the perfect prelude to an honest exchange. The regulars of Legazpi don’t drink to get drunk; they drink to talk with honesty. The prescription runs thus: one drink for quality conversations, two for a good time, three to bare your soul to a stranger. I quite like being sober, but the truth feels pretty damn good.

Photography by Nikki Bonuel

THE BELLE & DRAGON IS LOCATED AT OPL BLDG, 100 A. PALANCA ST., MAKATI CITY.
THE CURATOR IS LOCATED AT 134 LEGASPI ST. CORNER C. PALANCA ST., MAKATI CITY.
BLIND PIG IS LOCATED AT 227 SALCEDO ST., MAKATI CITY.
cedric
Cedric S. Reyes
Cedric had the squid. For more of this nonsense follow him on Twitter at @cedritoreyes.
food + drinks by Sam Potenciano

What to Do This Weekend: The Poblacion Edition

A definitive guide to the former red light district from sun up to sun down.

Get your stomach ready by watching this video. It’s gonna be a long day ahead.

Roll out of bed for a chorizo and egg breakfast sandwich (or two) at Bean & Yolk in Polaris. Grab a Latte Gianduja while you’re at it.bean-and-yolk-2Build up an appetite by taking a walk and exploring the rarely discussed backstreets of Poblacion. Just a few streets away from the sleazy, electric energy of P. Burgos and the burgeoning ‘Williamsburgos’ food scene is one of the oldest churches in the entire country. Founded in 1620, San Pedro Macati Church (also known as Saints Peter and Paul Parish) is a curious historical relic sandwiched in between local schools and busy street food vendors.

Within walking distance of the church is the Poblacion Public Market at the corner of Gabladon and Escuela Street, which has a reputation for being the personal, secret Alterations Plus of the titas of Forbes set. Aside from housing fresh produce and some of the best, low-key tailors in Makati, the public market also houses an adorable abundance of sleepy cats who won’t mind being Boomeranged for your Insta-satisfaction.

For lunch head to Ebro street and order up a couple plates of affordable, authentic Mediterranean food at the colorful, cozy Kite Kebab Bar. Their biryani and grilled meat combos are hard to beat both in terms of quality and price.kite-4Grab a post-lunch cup of Single Origin coffee at Commune and mingle with fellow caffeine-addicts at one of their communal tables. If you’re lucky you might even get to catch one of their weekend film screenings or workshops.commune-1Dessert-wise, you can’t go wrong with one of Bucky’s soft-serve parfaits or their well-loved, gooey brownie hybrids.buckys-5If you’re in the mood for a life-changing haircut or even just a dose of daily inspiration, drop by Kapwa Studio—a community-based creative space that serves as a gallery/salon/all around local goods shop. It’s a great way to get a feel of the emerging local arts scene.kapwa-8Walk on over to La Casita Mercedes, a restored pre-colonial home from the 1930s that has become the area’s most beloved and under the radar bed and breakfast. Just a few streets away, you’ll also find Tilde Hand Craft Café. Sit down for a slice of one of Ginny de Guzman’s homebaked cakes and don’t forget to take out a loaf of their freshly-baked sourdough bread. If you’re a fan of day drinking (who isn’t?), try one of their very own craft beers.la-casita-3Keep the ball rolling by arranging to meet up with your friends for an all-night pub crawl. Alamat, Alchemy Bistro Bar, Pura Vida, and Senor Pollo are just a few drinking hole favorites that truly come alive after hours.poblacion regular 3Fuel up in between drinks with sticks of Japanese yakitori meets Pinoy street food at Tambai to soak up the alcohol._mg_3768Even though the vibrant, raucous red light district was originally meant to be experienced at night, it’s hard to find a neighborhood that remains as constantly exciting and engaging as Poblacion is from sun up to sun down.

Photos by Renzo Navarro (Bean and Yolk, Bucky’s, Commune, Kite Kebab Bar, Kapwa Studio, La Casita Mercedes, Tambai) and Nikki Bonuel (Pura Vida)

Sam Potenciano
Sam Potenciano
Sam is the digital editor of L’Officiel Manila. Formerly the founding editor of The Neighborhood and the editor-in-chief of Candy magazine, she is also a columnist for The Philippine Star's Young Star section. Follow her on Instagram at @sampotenciano.
style by Emil Hofileña

Getting Some Peace of Mind

Through its communal atmosphere and personal approach, Kapwa Studio can turn even the most hesitant customer into a work of art.

When you’re a teenager on the edge of adulthood, few things feel as liberating as finally breaking free from your school’s strict haircut rule. For twelve years, I had been forbidden from letting my hair touch my eyebrows, my ears, and the collar of my school uniform. So when my high school batchmates and I finally got to college, we saw it as a time for long, flowing locks, buckets of wax and styling gel, and hairstyles that our parents explicitly told us not to get. In the four years that followed, we let our hair run wild and free.

kapwa-2But all good things must eventually be cut short. With admittedly more than a little hesitation, I traveled to Kapwa Studio in Poblacion, Makati to say goodbye to my old hair and hello to something totally different: an undercut with a peace sign detailed onto the back of my head. Don’t ask.

kapwa-3Kapwa is a coworking creative space that most often functions as a barbershop and salon, but is open to hosting all manner of events and workshops, from dance classes to acoustic gigs. This might come as a surprise to anybody who sees the compact interior of the studio; it’s essentially just one room with two hairdressing stations, a small lower level for rinsing and shampooing, and a few closet-sized spaces hidden in the corners.

kapwa-4But where Kapwa really comes to life is in the details. The studio’s Creative Director, Leslie Ferrer Espinosa, took us on a brief tour and displayed how almost everything in the space is mobile, or can serve multiple purposes. The reception desk turns into a bar during parties, the blinds can be lowered and the lighting adjusted to tailor to a photographer’s needs, and the floor space can be completely cleared. Perhaps most impressive are the tall mirrors used by the stylists, which double as cabinets for their tools, and can become whiteboards when flipped around, or even full-body dance mirrors when placed side-by-side.

kapwa-5Leslie emphasizes how they want Kapwa to be recognized as multipurpose, unisex, and a place where any and all artists and creatives can bond and connect. It very much looks like a space inhabited and shared by a community supporting each other’s art—as seen from a painting at the back of the room, a ukulele sitting on the reception counter, an assortment of artisanal products for sale near the entrance and, of course, a fully operational coffee machine.

As a result, Kapwa feels much bigger than it seems not because of its physical dimensions, but because of the different ways its inhabitants utilize the space. “It’s like the living room we never had,” Leslie says.

kapwa-6It was mostly this homely living room vibe and the warmth of the staff that calmed my nerves. Leslie spoke about how everybody who goes to Kapwa is treated like a personal work of art—something I felt from the minute I sat down. Getting a haircut here wasn’t just a matter of requesting a certain style and passively staring at your reflection as you wait for it to be finished.

I first had an in-depth consultation with my stylist, Anthony “Joe” Camacam, who suggested that the peace sign at the back of my head be accompanied by some cool fading so as not to look flat. There was careful consideration with the way he was deciding what would fit my hair best, and that’s what made me let go of whatever doubt I had left. I wasn’t in the hands of a barber; I was in the hands of an artist.

kapwa-7What surprised me the most about the process was how delicate and thorough it was. I must have spent about an hour in the chair as Joe shaved off every layer and carved out the peace sign one millimeter at a time with a heated razor. It’s a little weird to say, but getting this haircut made me more aware of my scalp than I had ever been before. After years of only having my bangs trimmed every so often, getting an undercut made me remember the shape of my head.

kapwa-8As Joe started applying finishing touches with hair clay, other customers and friends of the owners arrived. My first instinct was to cover my face in embarrassment, but as they saw what Joe had done with the back of my head, I only heard voices of approval and someone saying, “That’s dope, man!”

I’ve always been insecure about having short hair precisely because of the shape of my head, so it was admittedly reassuring to hear so much support from total strangers. It would be cliché if I said I stood up from that chair feeling like a ‘new me,’ but I will say that I left Kapwa feeling much more confident than I thought I would be.

kapwa-9Saying goodbye to my college hair has taken some getting used to. Now when I’m out in the open, I feel like a turban-less Professor Quirrell from the first Harry Potter movie, with the face of Voldemort growing from my scalp. My friends consoled me by saying that I did, in fact, look more like Ezra Miller’s character from Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them—but it was up to me if I would let that be a bad thing.

It’s not a bad thing. When it comes down to it, I’m happy to have stopped by Kapwa for this haircut—not necessarily because of how it looks on me, but because of what it stands for. It’s a testament to the sheer talent of our local stylists and artists, and it serves as a small reminder that the most important thing we can do in our divided world is to always keep peace at the back of our minds.

Produced by Alyssa Castillo
Photography by Renzo Navarro
Special thanks to Deejae Pa’este

KAPWA STUDIO IS OPEN FROM 8AM TO 11PM ON WEDNESDAYS TO SUNDAYS. FOLLOW THEM ON FACEBOOK AT FACEBOOK.COM/KAPWASTUDIO.
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Emil Hofileña
Emil is a staff writer at Rogue Media. He spends way too much time and money watching movies, crying to Hamilton, and fawning over Carly Rae Jepsen. He believes all stories are worth telling. Follow him on Youtube at youtube.com/cinemil and on Twitter at @EmilHofilena.
food + drinks by Justine Limjoco

Drop Your Brunch Plans and Head Straight to Bean & Yolk

This tiny third wave coffee and breakfast sandwich joint is worth setting your weekend alarm for.

If I’m going to get out of my pajamas only to be served a run-of-the-mill breakfast, then I’d have to give it a hard pass. My daily Starbucks run and culinary masterpiece of the boiled egg are usually enough to get me going in the morning.

But for Bean & Yolk, a tiny café along busy Polaris Street, I might make the rare exception.

bean-and-yolkBean & Yolk resembles most other trendy third wave cafés—in other words, its interiors are heavily Pinterest-esque. Composed of familiar elements like cement walls and wooden tables, they even have hanging light bulbs with copper elements that mutely add to the café’s contemporary aesthetic. No surprises here. But I think this is what, at the same time, is so charming about it. The place does its job of setting a modern yet warm vibe, mostly due to its limited capacity. Anything more than fifteen people inside at a time would be a violation of personal space.

What is intriguing for breakfast afficionados is that coffee and eggs are the only things on their menu. But they don’t just serve coffee and eggs; they skillfully transform the two most universal culinary staples into delicious masterpieces. And it all started with a trip Down Under.

bean-and-yolk-2Papo Jorolan, Bean & Yolk’s owner, used to be a flight attendant. She shares that the coolest part of her job was that she was able to visit so many coffee shops all over the world, with her favorites being the ones from Sydney and Melbourne. Whether it were experimental coffee labs or classic coffee houses, all her favorite cafés had one thing in common—they all served up simple, no-fuss fare. No fancy, no schmancy.

She loved the idea so much that she decided to bring it to life back home in Manila. She, along with her husband Chukoy, wanted to put up a place that took a straightforward and direct approach. Drifting away from more typically complex menus, Bean & Yolk brings us back to the roots of what it means to simply eat good food. With the help of chef Ed Bugia, the couple crafted the perfect menu.

bean-and-yolk-3Bugia, of Backyard Kitchen + Brew and Breakfast and Pies, turned the humble egg into several dishes that will satisfy almost anyone. I personally loved the Lucy, which is made up of a comforting egg salad nestled between two of the softest homemade brioche buns.

For something more filling, there’s also the chorizo patty, topped with a perfectly cooked and lightly salted fried egg. Everything is specially made and delivers a burst of flavor with every bite. I totally get why this savory breakfast sandwich is a bestseller.

bean-and-yolk-4If a bun and egg combo isn’t your style, try the Molly, a unique pile of truffle oil, silky poached egg, and mashed potatoes that serve as the dip to slices of crunchy crostini. If you really want to take their simple food concept to the task, don’t miss Cara’s Fave—Bean & Yolk’s take on the classic grilled cheese.

_mg_2098Another of Bean & Yolk’s strengths is that each of these dishes were created with the idea that they would be served with coffee. For this, Jorolan enlisted the help of another industry favorite, Jonathon Choi of Magnum Opus and Restock, to supply the drinks. Choi’s concoction, the Latte Gianduja, is for those who enjoy their sugar-and-caffeine boost without the bitterness.

bean-and-yolk-5Bean & Yolk, with its full-flavored and ingredient-focused menu, is the quintessential brunch spot. As a fan of sleep, I can vouch that this place is definitely worth getting out of bed early for…. or not.

It’s past noon and I’m dying for a Lucy.

Photography by Renzo Navarro

BEAN AND YOLK IS LOCATED AT UNIT G6 BEL AIR SOHO SUTIES, POLARIS ST, POBLACION IN MAKATI CITY.  FOLLOW THEM ON INSTAGRAM AT @BEANANDYOLKPH.

 

the-neighborhood-logo-hi-res
Justine Limjoco
Justine Limjoco is a contributor to The Neighborhood.
food + drinks by Sam Potenciano

Everyday is Like Sunday’s at 12/10’s Sake Night

Why can’t every night be Sake Night?

On a busy week night at the tail-end of November, patrons dutifully packed 12/10 in Guijo Street for limited seatings of their second round of Sake Night. Featuring a special 7-course menu and four pairings of specialty sake to match, the 12/10 team was joined by Elliot Faber, the Hong Kong-based beverage director of Yardbird, Ronin, and Sunday’s Grocery.

Elliot, who is literally a Sake Samurai (a prestigious title given out to only a handful of sake-loving individuals by the Japan Sake Brewers Association), made the rounds the entire night, approaching tables and offering his personal insights and recommendations regarding each of the night’s pairings. 12/10’s Thea de Rivera and Gab Bustos worked with Elliot regarding the selection of each of the night’s dishes in order to perfectly complement and bring out the subtle notes in each drink.

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The first sake of the night was Sunday’s Junmai, meant to be sipped while enjoying the first two courses: umami bread paired with a dipping sauce of sesame oil, balsamic vinegar, and maple, and followed by fresh, Aklan oysters drizzled with almond milk, petals, and the citrus acidity of yuzukosho.

Junmai sake (which translates to ‘Pure Rice Sake’) is characterized by its robust, earthy flavor—a direct effect of its only four ingredients: rice, water, yeast, and koji mold. No additional alcohol is added in the fermentation process, and the resulting sake’s depth is usually matched with richer dishes—hence the umami and the seafood.

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The second sake, Chikusen Junmai Daiginjo, was my personal favorite: smooth on the palate, well-balanced, and delicate. The rice grains in Daiginjo sakes are more polished, resulting in softer, more complex tones. I happily nursed this drink while tucking into the wonderfully exquisite combination of scallop, yuzu, avocado, and karasumi in a compact tart, which was then followed by a miso eggplant dish dipped in bits of pinipig.

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The main courses of night were served alongside the Okura Honke Tokubetsu Junmai Yamahai. Large tiger prawns bathed in kombu butter and drenched in lemon paired well with the full bodied Junmai. The mouth-watering gyukatsu was tender and pink on the inside and rolled in the finest coating of crisp panko crumbs on the outside—a deeply savory protein that ached to be eaten with its accompanying bowl of tamarind mushroom rice.sundays-2Last but not least, the night ended full circle with another Sunday’s Grocery sake: a shot (or two) of the Sunday’s Nigori. Through our cheerful bartender, I learned that the cloudy appearance of this last sake was the result of unfiltered grain solids in the Nigori. Often served with sweeter dishes, the complexity of this drink was unfortunately lost on me because all I could think about was dessert.

The kinu tofu in a sweet corn paste topped with cereal and uni was unlike anything I’d ever tried before, and I couldn’t wrap my mind around how good all these disparate flavors tasted when thrown into a single dish. I spent the last few minutes of the seating entranced by the sheer brilliance of incorporating uni’s creamy texture and briny flavor into a dessert.

While I may have checked out by the last drink, I’ll definitely be first in line when the next 12/10 Sake Night pops up; building up my resistance to sake and uni distractions until then.

Photography by Ralph Mendoza

12/10 IS LOCATED AT 7635 GUIJO STREET, SAN ANTONIO VILLAGE IN MAKATI CITY. FOLLOW THEM ON INSTAGRAM AT @TWELVETENPH.
SHOP SUNDAY’S GROCERY ONLINE AT STORE.SUNDAYSGROCERY.COM AND FOLLOW THEM ON INSTAGRAM AT @SUNDAYSGROCERY.
Sam Potenciano
Sam Potenciano
Sam is the digital editor of L’Officiel Manila. Formerly the founding editor of The Neighborhood and the editor-in-chief of Candy magazine, she is also a columnist for The Philippine Star's Young Star section. Follow her on Instagram at @sampotenciano.
home + design by Alyssa Castillo

Inside Jaja Samaniego’s Pinterest-worthy HQ

Do not read if you absolutely hate pretty offices.

If you’ve ever wondered what it’s like to work in the wedding industry as a photographer, you might have heard of Jaja Samaniego. While you might expect a wedding photographer’s office to be an outpouring of pastel colors, floral arrangements, and basically everything Martha Stewart Weddings, that’s not actually the case. A crossover of minimalism and industrial design, Jaja has transformed her HQ into a passion project filled with details inspired by her travels; one that chronicles her love affair with cities like NYC, Sidney, and Melbourne.jlp_8599jlp_8778Originally just a bare spot, her current workspace was initially (and accidentally) discovered while running errands around a quiet village near Makati’s Central Business District.

The first thing Jaja decided was to take on the decorating herself with the help of her friend and business partner, Toni. The pair purchased custom-made tables, desks, and shelves, as well as vintage card catalogue drawers that wouldn’t look out of place on Downton Abbey. These, however, pale in comparison to the wall decorations: huge blow-ups of the Manila Bay sunset, an Andy Warhol print from MoMa, and a framed shot of Paris that she couldn’t pass on when she was on top of the Eiffel Tower.jaja-webA bunch of old souls, the team of 25 shares a love for both the new and the old; especially for classic, analog collectibles like vinyl records (Daft Punk’s Random Access Memories is a favorite) that they play on an Audio Technica turntable and Marshall speakers. Independent magazines like KinfolkCerealPaper SeaFrankie, and The Gentlewoman as well as photography books by Avedon and Leibovitz also take up precious shelf space.

Complementing the space’s neutral palette are Anna Jimenez’s macramé pieces, air plants and succulents from Baguio, dried eucalyptus leaves from Hidalgo, and dried lavender from Florence—yes, actual Italian lavender. They are also currently collaborating with Danika Rio, the artist and designer behind Nava Boutique, on a botanical-themed mural.jaja-web-3jaja-web-2Despite the impressive interiors of their studio, none of these designs would literally see the light of day without the help of the ample natural light that seeps through the space’s glass walls. An element that helps the team brew ideas, stay creative, and keep the atmosphere, well, light.jlp_8632The Jaja Samaniego Photography team accepts year-round projects locally as well as abroad, and are often fully-booked from October to March, even on weekends and holidays. It has to be asked though: who wouldn’t mind clocking in a little over time in an office as beautiful as theirs?

Photos by Jaja Samaniego

JAJA SAMANIEGO‘S STUDIO IS LOCATED AT 9053 BANUYO ST., SAN ANTONIO VILLAGE IN MAKATI CITY. VISIT THEIR WEBSITE AT JAJASAMANIEGO.COM.
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Alyssa Castillo
Alyssa Castillo is a freelance writer and is concurrently Rogue Media's Editorial Assistant for The NBHD. She reads for fun, writes for a living, and wastes too much time entertaining the possibility of a zombie apocalypse. Find her on Instagram as @alyssakcastillo.