Tag Archives: Start Something

wellness by Cindy Go

Start Something: Lagree Fitness

7 exercise moves to tone your body from our new go-to workout

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Getting back into the groove of any workout can be tough after the holidays. But with the New Year come #newyearnewme resolutions that begin with fitness goals. We’ve discovered an easier way of getting that flat tummy you’ve always wanted to that perky butt your jeans have been dreaming about. All with a 45-minute low impact workout called Lagree Fitness™.

Janie Hale is the founder, owner and instructor of Elev8, the BGC-based studio that offers the workout. She describes the exercise as, “a full body fat incinerating, calorie burning, muscle shaking class where you can work off about 500-800 calories per session.” Her mindset is that you don’t need more time to get fit, you just need more intensity. “All sessions are a full body workout: arms, legs and core. We spend about half the session on our legs. Leg exercises increase the heart rate and provide the highest caloric and fat burn.”

Below are seven essential moves, demonstrated by Hale, that promise to transform your body:

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French Twist (obliques, triceps, shoulders, lats)
Align feet heel to toe in one direction and shoulders above the wrists and depressed into the lats. Straighten legs and slowly send the carriage toward the front platform. Lower hips until the body is in a diagonal line from the crown of the head to the heels. Control the carriage by flexing from the obliques and drawing the hips back up. Repeat for 1-1.5 minutes

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Reverse Bear (abdominals, tricepsm shoulders, lats)
Start in a plank position; keep the shoulders depressed into the lats and the back in a tabletop position. Bend at the hips and knees to bring the carriage toward the front platform. Bring the knees toward the chest without tilting the spine and keep the abdominals engaged to stabilize. The carriage travels away from the front platform by straightening the legs to a full plank position. Repeat for 1-1.5 minutes.

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Standing Inner Thighs (adductors, glutes)
Keep one foot on the front platform and the other on the carriage. Knees and toes point in the same direction. Send the carriage open with straight legs, pulling equally with both legs as you draw the carriage back in. Keep the body weight centered so that the tension is felt on both legs. Repeat for 2 minutes.

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Squats (hamstrings, abductors, glutes, quadriceps)
Keep one foot on the platform and place the other on the carriage. Press the carriage open just beyond hip-distance apart to keep the body weight centered and the tension is felt equally on both legs. The carriage remains stationary throughout the entire movement. Bending at the knees, sit the hips back, to go down into a squat. Press through the heels to come back to standing, keeping tension through the legs.

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Escalator Lunges (hamstrings, glutes)
Place the foot of the primary leg steps onto the carriage while the foot of the secondary leg stays on the front platform. Keep the weight on the primary (front) leg with the back leg straight and the heel lifted throughout the exercise. Feet are hip distance apart, shoulders and hips are square to the back. Bend the front leg to send the a carriage out into a lunge, ensuring the knee is aligned directly above the ankle. Press the front foot into the carriage to lift up toward the standing position, pulling the muscles in the back of the front leg.

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Giant Chest Press (chest, abdominals, glutes)
Sitting on the back platform with red cables in hand. Slide the body forward so that the head and shoulder blades lie on the back platform. Keep the feet grounded with the knees above the ankles. Spine is straight in a neutral position with the glutes engaged. Torso is in a tabletop position. Press the cables up and together toward the sky. Bending at the elbows, lower the cables down, keeping the hands above the elbows and the tension on the springs. Repeat for 1 minute.

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Lat Pull Down (Back, Lats)
Kneeling on the carriage facing the back. Sitting on the back of the heels, use the rails to pull yourself back to the high handlebars. The glutes lift off the heels and the back is flat. Maintaining a straight spine, slowly extend the arms, as the carriage travels back toward the front platform. Squeeze the     shoulders, back, and lats as you bend the arms, bringing the carriage toward the back. Repeat for 1 minute.

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PRICING SCHEMES ARE AVAILABLE ON ELEV8.PH. ELEV8 LAGREE FITNESS STUDIO IS AT Ore Central, 9th Avenue, Corner 31st St., BGC, 541-5289, And ON FACEBOOK AND INSTAGRAM.
Cindy Go
Cindy Go
She is the Beauty and Wellness editor of TheNeighborhood.ph. She loves dogs.
food + drinks by Mags Ocampo

Start Something: Brewing Coffee

The Yardstick Coffee team teaches us how to concoct the perfect cup of joe at home

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There once was a time when 3-in-1 coffee reigned supreme, when fancy brews were but a luxury. For a lot of men and women, those days seem unfathomable. The widespread of third wave coffee and the rise of artisanal cafés have spoiled most of us by refining our palates, making us all crave for brews beyond purely utilitarian reasons.

Today, we want to take your obsession a little bit further by learning how to be your own barista. Here’s what we learned from a basic brewing class with Yardstick Coffee: a good homemade brew is only a few simple steps away. Watch how.

 

 

Choose
The first step is choosing, particularly your equipment and beans. This step is important because the decisions you make will determine the overall quality and flavor of your coffee.

You can pick from three major brewing methods: pour-over, full immersion, or hybrid. The pour-over method is pretty self-explanatory and allows for the most control but is the most meticulous of manual methods. Full immersion, on the other hand, entails completely submerging your ground coffee and allowing it to steep over a certain period of time in your chosen apparatus: siphons, vacuum pots, French presses, etcetera. This technique produces deep-flavored brews. The best of both worlds, however, is truly achieved through the hybrid method. A prime example of accessible equipment for this kind of method is the aeropress. This is a fancy little gadget that gets the robust flavors associated with steeping but that also maintains the clean taste and smooth texture of pour-over coffee.

After deciding how to make your coffee, it’s time to choose the actual beans. There are four factors to consider when choosing coffee beans: roast date, origin, roast style, and processing. While flavors and aromas are usually noted on the packaging, here are some important things to remember when choosing beans: Always check the roast date as coffee should ideally be consumed within 30-45 days of roasting; make sure the roast style jives with what equipment you have at home (it never hurts to ask but generally light to medium roasts are for filters and pour-overs while medium to dark roasts are for espresso machines); and it’s always better to grind your coffee yourself to retain caffeine and flavor.

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Measure and Grind
Speaking of grinding, it’s important to know what kind of grind matches your brewing method of choice. For pour-overs and hybrids, medium to medium-coarse ground beans are best. For full-immersion methods, it’s best to use coarse ground beans to keep the final brew as clean as possible.

Take note that the ideal ratio for dose:grind is 1:15-1:19. For example, when making coffee for a single person, the best measurements to follow are 15g of ground beans: 225g of water. Try to be as precise as possible when weighing your beans and measuring your water in order to avoid waste and to get a perfectly balanced blend.

Avoid grinding your beans in advance. Doing so will make your coffee go stale.

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Brew
When it comes to actually brewing your coffee, it’s best to use filtered water. Mineral water has a tendency to push down flavours aggressively, bad flavors, included. Distilled water has the opposite effect and may ultimately lead to blandness. The ideal temperature for brewing is 92-96 degrees Celsius. Since most of us don’t have professional pots that accurately measure our water’s warmth, here’s a pro-tip from the folks over at Yardstick: let your water reach boiling point (100 degrees Celsius) and then wait exactly a minute before using it to brew your coffee. The temperature will have gone down to 93-94 degrees.

Always remember to distribute the water as evenly as possible, wetting all the ground coffee you possibly can. Seeing as the water is pre-measured, it’ll be easy to know when to stop for pour-overs and hybrid equipment. For full-immersion techniques, stir vigorously and then allow the coffee to steep for 3-5 minutes. Once your drip is done or your steeping time is up, it’s time to enjoy a quality cup of joe in the comfort of your own home.

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Photography by Renzo Navarro
Art Direction and Video Editing by Mags Ocampo

FOR A MORE DETAILED LESSON ON THE ART OF BREWING AS WE AS CLASSES ON ESPRESSO-MAKING AND LATTE ART, SIGN UP FOR A TWO-DAY CRASH COURSE AT YARDSTICK. IT IS AT UNIVERSAL LMS BUILDING, 106 ESTEBAN STREET, LEGASPI VILLAGE, MAKATI, 845-0073, AND ON FACEBOOK AND INSTAGRAM.
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Mags Ocampo
Mags Ocampo is a twenty-two-year-old writer, graphic designer, and life guru (or so her friends claim). She currently works as Rogue Media Inc.'s Digital Art Director and takes freelance jobs on the side. She likes diving into whitecaps, reading sad books, and trying to tear down the patriarchy during her spare time. She's taken on adulthood by changing her screen names to her actual name, and thus, can be found as @magsocampo on Twitter and Instagram.